The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) in partnership with the Bass Coast Shire Council, University of Melbourne and Lang Lang Foreshore Reserve Committee of Management have developed an erosion management plan that will focus on a hybrid approach to combat erosion at Jam Jerrup, on the Bass Coast.

The Jam Jerrup coastline has been experiencing significant erosion that is impacting on native vegetation, public access and safety in the area.

The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) in partnership with the Bass Coast Shire Council, University of Melbourne and Lang Lang Foreshore Reserve Committee of Management have developed an erosion management plan that will focus on a hybrid approach to combat erosion in the area.

Critical work implementing these management actions to protect the coastline along Jam Jerrup have been ongoing since April 2021.

Seeking to slow the increasing rate of erosion to the Jam Jerrup coastline and protect important community assets these works will combine tried and tested methods of hard-structure coastal defence with new trials of nature-based solutions, led by the University of Melbourne.

The program consists of:

  • The placement of a 150-metre rock revetment to extend the existing revetment, to prevent further terminal scouring.
  • Earthworks to cut and reshape the cliff face to create a safe batter, with the excess material placed behind the new revetment.
  • The installation and planting of mangroves in concrete planter clusters along the southern section of the Jam Jerrup coastline and the construction of an additional 150 meters of rock armouring at the base of the lower, southern end of the cliff, serves as a hybrid solution to erosion in this location.

This hybrid solution to coastal erosion, including the use of mangroves are part of a world-wide push to find natural means of coastal erosion prevention and will contribute to a study being conducted by the University of Melbourne. The finding of this study may influence future coastal erosion projects.

Regional Manager, Land and Built Environment Programs, Jeremy Neilson described the project as finding the balance between seeing immediate results in slowing coastal erosion and preparing for a nature based long term strategy in the future.

“Mangroves are a cost-effective and sustainable option for coastal erosion management,” he said.

“Over time they will act as a natural wave break, protecting the coastline and allowing for sand to build up and form a beach.”

Installation of both the rock revetment and rock armouring was completed in early July with the mangrove planters scheduled to be installed in September when the tide allows.

For further information on Jam Jerrup costal protection please contact DELWP Bairnsdale on 03 5152 0600.

Jam Jerrup Erosion at April 2021