The Barengi Gadjin Wimmera River Aboriginal Water Project – called River Yarns – has provided the opportunity for Traditional Owners to get out on country, reconnect with important places and talk to water managers about their ideas and passion for how water is managed along the Wimmera river.

The aim of this project was to discover more about significant story places, plant and animal species along the rivers from Traditional Owners to enable these values to be supported using environmental flows. To achieve this objective, we used the Aboriginal Waterways Assessment.

Out in the field during the River Yarns project. Photo by Wimmera CMA.

Out in the field during the River Yarns project. Photo by Wimmera CMA.

The elders had not been to some of these places for a long time and it was very emotional to go back there.
Ben Muir, Wimmera CMA Aboriginal Water Officer

The project found that one of the most significant benefits for Traditional Owners was the opportunity to reconnect with many parts of their country.

The river trips and community gatherings, as part of this project, generated memories and stories that have not been shared for decades.

Stories from the River Yarns project are now being shared through gatherings and performances, films and an interactive online story map.

Out in the field during the River Yarns project. Photo by Wimmera CMA.

Out in the field during the River Yarns project. Photo by Wimmera CMA.